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OK Audi lovers.... here it is, what you all have been waiting for...
Due to such a *HIGH* demand for this info, I will gladly share my experiences
with all.  Finding a cheap way to fix my windows was a necessity at the time.
I didn't want to shell out over $100 for a whole new regulator or used one
for that fact.  I mean all it was was a cable that had broke.  SO, I finally
found a way to do it for a mere fraction of the cost.  And if Audi hasn't
raised their prices on these little swivel pins, then you to should be able
to fix a window for about $5.  

I used some of the following tools, but you might need more:
Needed a hex point scredriver (The one that looks like a star on the end)
10mm socket for rachet
pliers 2 of em
and or vicegrips
a flathead scredriver and phillips
a belt sander, but a grinder of some type will do

And you need, 1/16 cable from the hardware store.  ( If not, than it is 1/8)
take a look at it before you go to buy :)
Get about 12 feet of it to be safe
and then at least 2 crimps for each window (More if you might screw up, who
cares anyway, they are like 9cents each :) )
And then of course the swivel pins.  This is the Part NO. from A Bentley
manual.  If it is changed please let us know.  I got this part from the
'90 200 Turbo Bentley.
Part NO# 111 129 921
You must get two of these for each window that needs fixing.

1) Remove door panel.  If you don't know how to do this, maybe you shouldn't
attempt this project. :)
2) If your window isn't rolled up, try to get it up.  If it is stuck down,
then you will have the burden of removing the whole inner door panel to do
the next part.
3) You need to first detach the window from the regulator.  There is a stop 
with a circlip that holds it on.  That stop has a couple of rubber washers and
plastic ones and 1 circlip.  To get the circlip off, you need to really try
to look behind it and find out how to pry it off there.  It can be a pain 
sometimes and someone with *strong* fingernails might be able to help.  If you
can't take the circlip off like it is supposed to, you can wedge the 
screwdriver behind it and try to pop it off.  I don't recommend this as you
might break it and or something else. (I did it once but I lucked out :) ) 
4) once the window is freed from the stop, have someone else make sure the 
it won't fall down on you while your are doing the rest.  REALLY IMPORTANT if
you have tinted windows as you could scratch them otherwise.  
5) remove the regulator from the door.  It should be (but not positive) 4 10mm
bolts holding the cable guide and 3 10mm nuts holding the regulator.
6) Now comes the fun part. You should now probably take the regulator inside
or something to work on it.  Remove the cover on the regulator with the hex
scredriver.  Pop the plastic piece out of their which winds the cable up.  
Remove the cable from the housing, how ever you see fit.  I cut it a couple
of times to make the job easier.  
7)  Remove the cable from the stop.  You might have to pry it out or something.
    IT can be a pain, but try not to demolish the stop while doing it.  
8) OK, at this point you should now have the following done:
	The old cable totally removed from the assembly
	The stop cable free
	The regulator in pieces :)
9)  Here is the tricky part now.  Take that cable you bought from the 
hardware store.  Take the metal crimps you bought for it.  push the cable 
through one side of the crimp and then back through the other side.  Make sure
you pull the cable through so that there is not much sticking out on the one side.  And the side that the cable is now throught (the bare end of the cable) that there is not a lot sticking out either.  With that accomplished, crimp the 
cable with vicegrips.
10) Do the same with the other end of the cable
11) Now remember on the plastic thing where you pulled the cable out from how
it had the metal crimped on the end?  Of course you do.  What you must do now,
is to grind your new crimps down to size (lengthwise) so they will fit in
there.  They will if done right.  Grind and try to put them in there so they
fit accordingly to the plastic piece.
12)  Once you have them to fit nice and as good as new, cut the cable in half.
13)  Now, wind the cable around the plastic piece like it was when you pulled
it apart. Once wound, stick it through the regulator assembly like it was.  
It can be fun, the cable always wants to unwind when trying to stick the 
plastic piece back in place.  But once everything is nice and neat, reassemble
the regultor.  
14)  Loop the cable back through the plastic guides with the springs at the
end and around the pulleys on the track guide.  
15) NOW, we are almost finished.  Take those swivel pins out now.  Take the 
cable and push it though one swivel pin and then through the other side of the
stop.  Now do the same with the other side of the cable only to make sure now
that you have plent of slack as in each swivel pin, you should have both ends
of the cable going though them and through the stop.  Pull the cable hand tight
for now and tighten down the swivel pins.
16) TIME OUT- forget one thing.  If the swivel pin bolts are too long, This 
will not work right.  You will have to file or hacksaw them down in size as I 
did.  But make sure not to much as you will not be able to tighten the cable.
17) Now, take the whole assembled regulator back out to your car.  Reconnect
ONLY the power to it.  Move the assembly down and up with the switch.  If it
doesn't go down all the way, or up, readjust the slack, etc.  THis is where
another person can come in hand.  That cable has to be real tight.  You will 
need pliers or (I recommend) vice grips to hold the cable while you pull on
it to adjust slack.  Once you have the window regulator operating like it
normally would, cut off most of the slack.  Leave a few inches in case you need
to play with it later.  You should now be ready to install it and have working
windows again!!

Any questions problems: e-mail me
Rob Andrews