<HTML><FONT FACE=arial,helvetica><FONT  SIZE=2 FAMILY="SANSSERIF" FACE="Arial" LANG="0">Hi Duncan:<BR>
An open diff will distribute torque 50/50 always regardless of tractive force.&nbsp; If the lowest wheel tractive force is 10lb/ft, then the other wheel will only produce a maximum 10lb/ft regardless of *actual* traction (traction potential).<BR>
In your one wheel on ice scenario, the wheel on pavement will only provide equal torque (tractive force) to the wheel on ice.&nbsp; IOW, if the wheel on ice is providing 10lb/ft of tractive force, then the wheel on pavement also provides 10lb/ft of tractive force.&nbsp; <BR>
<BR>
In the torsen with a 3:1TBR if the lowest wheel tractive force is 10lb/ft, the torsen can distribute torque up so up 3 times that force to the apposing wheel, or put another way, one wheel can support 30lb/ft of torque, with&nbsp; the lowest tractive wheel supporting 10lb/ft.&nbsp; Remember too tho, that a Torsen is a 50/50 split diff (just like open or locked) up to wheel slip, so torque *shift* is only 20lb/ft in a rwd car.<BR>
In your one wheel on ice scenario, 10lb/ft is supported by the wheel on ice, 30lb/ft is supported by the wheel on pavement.&nbsp; <BR>
<BR>
WRT torque ring gear vs T1/T2, this list has come to the conclusion that any torque in excess of tractive ability goes to spinning up the wheel with the least traction.&nbsp; T1 + T2 = Trg where T1&nbsp; = tractive force + slip ((+ gearing) - frictional losses)) and T2 = tractive force + slip ((+ gearing - frictional losses)).&nbsp; <BR>
<BR>
So in the scenarios above, the open diff will support 20 lb/ft of torque, then the wheel on ice will spin up. The torsen will support 40lb/ft of torque, then the wheel on ice will spin up.<BR>
<BR>
HTH<BR>
<BR>
Scott Justusson</FONT></HTML>